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Five years ago, this humble blog received its one millionth visitor.  That was a big thing at the time, apparently, because I devoted a whole blog post to it and even gave away a book.  Well, last night the magic visitor-counter hit nine million, and I got nothing.  Celebrating hit-counter milestones is so aught-five.  And remember aught-four?  Back then, the blog looked like this.  It was a different time, I tell you.  Look at that blogroll!  “Chun the Unavoidable”—whatever happened to that guy, I wonder?

Well, I suppose this means I should stick around long enough to see whether another giant nuclear fireball will consume this blog when the hit counter rolls over at 9999999. I see that ye ancient “one million visitors” post mentions the four technical disasters that befell this blog in its first fifteen months, and I reflect happily on the fact that we haven’t had a single meltdown since, not even after the first GNF hit in January 2007.  Yay Expression Engine!  And you know what else?  This blog is, and always has been, 100 percent JS-Kit free.  Yay functioning comments section!

Hey, I know: I’ll leave you all with a song for the weekend.  We could make it Arbitrary But Fun:  best one-note solo in a pop song, ever.  Janet and Jamie and I are heading to the state this obscure but fetching band came from (indeed, I would never have heard of this song but for the Lyon clan), and while we’re gone, this might be a good time for some of you lurkers to de-lurk and say hello.

Posted by on 04/02 at 08:57 AM
  1. Caught Joe Jackson on the teevee many moons ago, just he and an enigmatic woman playing congas. I think the song was “Stranger Than Fiction.” He played the break on that Stevie Wonder “Fingertips Part Deux” doodad—harmonium? clarimonica?—that indeed consisted of one lengthy note.

    It was quite witty.

    Posted by David J Swift  on  04/02  at  10:44 AM
  2. eil Young, “Cinnamon Girl”.

    Ok, I cheated. And to do that and then post the second comment is a pretty crummy thing to do. But since I quickly stumbled upon the clear winner, I felt compelled to do so. I blame loose sexual mores in late ‘60s LA.

    NY: ... First of all, it doesn’t matter if you can play a scale. It doesn’t matter if your technique is good. If you have feelings that you want to get out through music, that’s what matters. If you have the ability to express yourself and you feel good when you do it, then that’s why you do it. The technical side of it is a completely boring drag, as far as I’m concerned. I mean, I can’t play fast. I don’t even know the scales. A lot of the notes that I go for are notes that I know aren’t there. They’re just not there, so you can hit any note. I’m just on another level as far as all that goes. I appreciate these guys who play great. I’m impressed by these metal bands with their scale guys. Like I go, “Gee, that’s really something.” I mean, Satriani and Eddie Van Halen are genious guitar players. They’re unbelievable musicians of the highest caliber. But I can’t relate to it. One note is enough.

    JO: ‘Cinnamon Girl.’ The one note solo.

    NY: Oh yeah---two strings, though. The same note on two strings. The wang bar made every one sound different. When people say “one note solo,” I listen to it and every one sounds different to me. It sounds like it’s all different in that one place. As you’re going in farther, you’re hearing all the differences, but if you get back, it’s all one.

    Plus I like his singing, which I have been led to understand is not a universally-held opinion among musical Nutmeggers--or anybody else.

    Posted by  on  04/02  at  12:42 PM
  3. +N

    And a very worthy runner-up from The Who.

    Posted by  on  04/02  at  12:45 PM
  4. And, as Neil once sang, “This Note’s for You.”

    Posted by Russell60  on  04/02  at  01:23 PM
  5. Technically it’s not pop, but J.B. Lenoir’s one-note solo across 12 bars in “Mama Talk to Your Daughter” has to be up there in all-time one-note solos.

    Posted by Mr. Trend  on  04/02  at  02:11 PM
  6. Chun still has a blog.  It’s under his real name, though.  Unless I completely misidentified who Chun is/was, which is possible.

    Posted by Rich Puchalsky  on  04/02  at  02:41 PM
  7. Presenting, for certain values of “best” and “pop”, the outtro to Money / The Flying Lizards. (Cool tip, JP, about the YouTube time index parameter.)

    Posted by  on  04/02  at  02:43 PM
  8. I must give props to Ludwig though, for his Fifth and its fourth note (with hat tip to Beatles).  Also Neil famously said: “It’s all one song; it’s all one note!”

    Posted by  on  04/02  at  09:25 PM
  9. In teaching your book on Jamie the other week (an honors seminar on the loose theme, “Human Being, Natural Being"), I was reflecting on the revelry that achievement brings to all parents, and how it is different for parents of children with significant delays. My younger daughter just develops. It’s great. I cheer. But she’s going to learn to walk without any effort before she’s one. She’s talking and babbling cheerfully. It’s great. I celebrate. But these milestones haven’t really taken any effort from me, except the usual parenting necessities of late nights, early mornings, foul messes, and a lot of time for play and affection. So much the better.

    With Nico, my son, things are very different for so many reasons, and development doesn’t always follow as linear a path. So imagine my surprise yesterday when he proved that he knows the alphabet, more or less.

    (video evidence http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTmN4wsHm_8)

    Which is apropos of nothing in this post, but in reading your book again, I thought of your blog post.

    Next week, we’ll debate Singer vs Berube. 10 rounds in the cage!

    Posted by  on  04/03  at  01:28 PM
  10. De-lurking as requested!  Hi everybody.  Thanks for all you do, including making me snort out various beverages with hilarity and glee.

    Posted by  on  04/03  at  02:59 PM
  11. Since this blog is at least vaguely language related, something funny happened yesterday that folks here might get kick out of -

    You know how it’s common (outside of educated and academic circles) to hear people say the word “antidote” when they really mean “anecdote”? Well for the first time ever I heard someone use the word “anecdote” when they really did mean “antidote”. This happened yesterday while someone was telling me a story about a pretty severe allergic reaction they had to medication. Yes, I was polite and did not correct them, nor did I tell them I found their use of the word “anecdote” far more interesting than the story itself.

    Posted by  on  04/03  at  04:25 PM
  12. Yay, Nico!

    Posted by Bill Benzon  on  04/03  at  07:10 PM
  13. Speaking of the Beatles, would it be prudent to offer the final note of A Day in the Life?

    Posted by  on  04/03  at  11:56 PM
  14. You didn’t notice what happened when it rolled to 666?  Bet you didn’t.  The rapture that’s what.
    No one else noticed but God.  He was surprised when no one showed up for the party.

    Posted by  on  04/04  at  04:53 PM
  15. The guy singing on No Good to Cry is a teenage Al Anderson, who later went on to form NRBQ.

    I’m going back to lurking now.

    Posted by  on  04/04  at  05:15 PM
  16. Satriani is to Neil OneNote as ....a Ferrari Tessarossa is to, like a ‘72 Ford Ranger.

    Kinder, gentler metal: Priestess

    Posted by Ezra Hound  on  04/05  at  10:01 AM
  17. cinnamon girl, yeah, but what first came to my mind was “cowgirls in the sand”, by the same estimable guitarist.

    (maybe cinnamon girl was slightly more pop.)

    in any case: YOU LIE!

    Posted by  on  04/05  at  10:40 AM
  18. Rich @ 6:  Chun still has a blog.  It’s under his real name, though.

    You’re telling me that Chun was not his real name?  And you decided to wait until now?

    O-Girl @ 11:  You know how it’s common (outside of educated and academic circles) to hear people say the word “antidote” when they really mean “anecdote”?

    For all intensive purposes, I am familiar with the tenants of that belief, and have always hoped to reign them in.  Thanks for finding the anecdote!

    hhmunro @ 15:  The guy singing on No Good to Cry is a teenage Al Anderson, who later went on to form NRBQ.

    Indeed it is!  And he shares the “I can’t believe a teenager has a voice like that” prize with the 16-year-old Alex Chilton, pbuh, who sang “The Letter.”

    Thanks for delurking.  You too, Elfarran @ 10!

    And finally, David @ 9:  So imagine my surprise yesterday when he proved that he knows the alphabet, more or less.

    That is completely and totally and world-transformingly awesome.  Thanks for capturing it and posting it on Ye Youtube for all of us to see—and go Nico go!

    Posted by Michael  on  04/05  at  11:41 AM
  19. For all intensive purposes, I am familiar with the tenants of that belief, and have always hoped to reign them in.  Thanks for finding the anecdote!

    Ha!

    I was supposed to have the day off today, except somebody called in sick and now I have to go in. The person who called in sick frequently uses the word “ironic” when she’s speaking about a “coincidence”. But she’s cool and doesn’t mind when I occasionally point it out. But mixing up “irony” and “coincidence” is still less irritating than a boring story about somebody’s allergic reaction to medication. I think we can all agree that to be noteworthy, stories about allergic reactions better involve either an actual death or an exploding penis.

    captcha: values

    Posted by  on  04/05  at  01:32 PM
  20. Well, in polite blog society, when asked to de-lurk a decent human being should always comply.

    I’m not quite sure of my reasons though.

    I have semi-religiously perused from the shadows since the re-opening of Airspace. There are many reasons I kept coming back: the wry sense of humor in the posts; the snappy repartee among the commentariat; the mesmerizing stare of Putin that I fear exerts some supernatural hold on me; the long teasing wait for the “hockey stick story” (which turned out to be well worth it I admit); these are just a few.

    Please continue, I thoroughly enjoy the show.

    OT but,your thoughts? Could you imagine Jon Hamm playing Reg Dunlop in the sacrilegious remake of Slap Shot? I aspire to be a casting director when I grow up. I think he could make that work.

    Posted by less of me  on  04/05  at  01:48 PM
  21. I think we can all agree that to be noteworthy, stories about allergic reactions better involve either an actual death or an exploding penis.

    Oh, indeed.  Same with weekends in Atlantic City.

    Are there no ironic coincidences, though?  Drat.

    Posted by  on  04/06  at  10:15 AM
  22. Robert Fripp, “Starless”.

    Posted by ben wolfson  on  04/06  at  04:52 PM
  23. Anybody can do a one-note solo. It takes real guts to do a two-note solo, and repeat it 66 times. Then call the song “Boredom.”

    Posted by dark viv bloom  on  04/06  at  07:02 PM
  24. Well, I suppose this means I should stick around long enough to see whether another giant nuclear fireball will consume this blog when the hit counter rolls over at 9999999.

    Now that’s the spirit of aught seven.  After the GNF I spent a few months hanging out with a small band of survivors before the food ran out.  I went out on my own following scarce game, eventually crossing a land bridge a couple of months back when I stumbled across this village - so familiar.  I assumed that it was just an hallucination but, instead of moving on, I was compelled to stay and lurk in the bushes surviving on leaves and insects with only an occasional foray away to the volcano to offer appropriate sacrifice. 

    Maybe it’s not just the fermented berries.  Maybe this place is real.  I’ll take a moment to scramble out from the tree line and call hello.  [and the volcano rumbled]

    Posted by  on  04/09  at  03:02 PM
  25. Not really a solo, or is it?
    It’s great anyway.
    “Samba De Uma Nota So” by Mr. Jobim

    Here’s Tom and the incomparable Elis Regina:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaM8eShHs8c

    Posted by  on  04/20  at  02:57 AM
  26. Grrr.
    Internets and their sneaky ways.
    It’s a picture of Elis and Tom, but it’s Nara Leao singing.  There doesn’t seem to be a video of their version of One-note Samba.
    So here they are with “Águas de Março,” which does quite a bit of tricky modulation around repeated notes.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srfP2JlH6ls

    Posted by  on  04/20  at  03:18 AM

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