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My old school

The good news is that I did not die last weekend, despite having to play four games in about 36 hours.  The bad news is that I returned to computer purgatory:  the laptop is back but it had to be “wiped,” and as a result, it has no recollection of killing John G. or having gone to Mars.  So now I have one laptop that has email but no word processing program, and another laptop that has word processing but cannot access the Internets.  The former can’t print, the latter can.  It’s a mess, basically.  I think I need one more laptop.

So I’ve managed to put 25 years of work onto a jump drive, work off the Internetless but printer-connected laptop, and come up with the material for my contribution to “The Classroom Revisited.” I’ll be teaching a class on disability studies in the humanities.  Oscar Pistorius, Professor Xavier, and Dumbo will all be mentioned, and of course I’ll work in a reference to Memento and Total Recall, the first of which makes one of my points about cognitive disability and narrative, and the latter of which, of course, is about employment-related disability.  No, really.  Why do you think those mutants are mutants?

The last time I visited Regis High School, your car radios were playing “I Will Survive” and “The Logical Song.” This will be interesting—and, I hope, less physically taxing than last week’s adventure.

While I’m gone, I should make good on that promise to post stuff about things and people I’ve seen lately.  So here’s Bill Shannon, inventor of the “Shannon Technique,” a dance technique named after himself, Bill Shannon.  He’s been a visiting artist this semester (he’s based in Pittsburgh, so he’s been traveling back and forth to teach a class), and back on March 26, Janet, Jamie and I had the privilege of seeing him perform.  (I chipped in a bit from my Personal Research Account to help bring him to campus.  I thought my Personal Research Account was for travel and material, like laptops, but I learned a few years ago I can invite people to campus with it, too.) In the course of his performance, he did a few deft disability-studies types moves, drawing attention to the fact that he can walk short distances without crutches and is sometimes suspected of “cheating”:  likewise, he noted, he sometimes sees people take off their eyeglasses and demonstrate that they can still see, so he outs them as frauds.  Conversely, he will exaggerate his dependence on crutches in certain contexts—say, airports—and then, pretending that he thinks no one is looking (though he knows they are, which is the whole entire point), he will scurry along for a few yards without the assistance of crutches, confusing matters still further.  I think of this as a wry commentary on Erving Goffman’s line in Stigma:  “in making a profession of their stigma, native leaders are obliged to have dealings with representatives of other categories, and so find themselves breaking out of the closed circle of their own kind.  Instead of leaning on their crutch, they get to play golf with it, ceasing, in terms of social participation, to be representative of the people they represent” (27).

In other words, this:

Also, this:

Back next week, I hope.

Posted by on 04/23 at 08:50 AM
  1. Those videos are 200% awesome.

    Posted by Orange  on  04/23  at  12:31 PM
  2. I thought my Personal Research Account was for travel and material, like laptops, but I learned a few years ago I can invite people to campus with it, too.

    Well, jeez, in that case, next time you have laptop terrors, don’t take it to those butchers at the computer boutique chain.  My hourly rates are extremely reasonable.  And results are guaranteed!  (You might not be happy with them, but results will definitely occur.)

    And ah, if only more of us could so elegantly cease to be representative of the people we represent.

    Posted by  on  04/23  at  02:34 PM
  3. Memento

    You might want to forgo having “Don’t believe his lies” scrawled on your picture on the promotional poster, though.

    Posted by  on  04/23  at  02:37 PM
  4. I’ve managed to put 25 years of work onto a jump drive...

    Cool, ain’t it?

    Posted by  on  04/23  at  03:03 PM
  5. I’ve managed to put 25 years of work onto a jump drive…

    Cool, ain’t it?

    Cool indeed. Electronic angels dancing on pins’ heads. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. TGIF.

    Posted by  on  04/23  at  04:32 PM
  6. These are amazing videos!  And now you’re back to high school, like Rodney Dangerfield (if he were alive). I hope you aren’t beaten savagely and thrown into a locker. Maybe that was just me.

    Posted by  on  04/23  at  05:40 PM
  7. Hours upon hours later, and no one has mentioned the ABF portion of this discourse:  late 1978. 

    Gosh when that song was coming out the Grateful Dead were in Egypt playing for Sadat’s wife at the base of the Great Pyramids.  And Carter was preparing to give his awesome malaise speech, dragging everyone down.  We had already had a US President who hit people with every golf ball he shot, and fell down every chance he had.  Neil Young got a divorce from Carrie Snodgress, and in 1978 Jack Nitzsche had beaten her with a handgun because she was seriously crazy.  The disco craze consumed attention in a manner most egregious. 

    So now Michael is making up for all of that with a class on disability?  Perhaps (captcha) its time has come.

    Posted by  on  04/24  at  11:52 AM
  8. Uh,

    PSU Prof. Reunion Cross-checking Conviction Upheld.

    Posted by poicephalus  on  04/25  at  12:27 AM
  9. o I’ve managed to put 25 years of work onto a jump drive, work off the Internetless but printer-connected laptop, and come up with the material for my contribution to “The Classroom Revisited.” I’ll be teaching a class on disability studies in the humanities.  Oscar Pistorius, Professor Xavier, and Dumbo will all be mentioned, and of course I’ll work in a reference to Memento and Total Recall, the first of which makes one of my points about cognitive disability and narrative, and the latter of which, of course, is about employment-related disability.  No, really.  Why do you think those mutants are mutants?

    Could this be about teaching at Cornell (-cough- College, not the University) 9th block next year?? I’ve signed up to take a class in Chicago for my sociology double major, but, argh! I’m feeling entirely too conflicted about this!

    Posted by  on  04/25  at  05:34 PM
  10. Those videos fascinated me.

    Posted by Hattie  on  04/25  at  06:51 PM
  11. the Grateful Dead were in Egypt playing for Sadat’s wife at the base of the Great Pyramids

    Top-notch shows though they may have resulted in some bad joss (like Sadat’s assassination)--blues for Allah a great and mostly unknown LP. 

    Berube’s “KTEL presents” at least outperforms an Unfogged quasi-musical thread, with like Miss J-Edgar-Breath and the little Rahmies-to-be offering 200+ belches on why they don’t like yoko ono.

    Posted by Ezra Hound  on  04/26  at  09:40 AM
  12. they may have resulted in some bad joss

    Including just how our speaker boxes got back through customs weighing nearly twice as much as when they left; leading directly to the awarding of silver spikes to the cast and crew and the ultimate demise of one Jerome Garcia.

    KTEL presents the Michael Bérubé collection:  i like this.

    Posted by  on  04/26  at  06:00 PM
  13. Our?? WTF?  Mr Weir?  Sir Lesh?  The Big H, routed through Cair-O?? I’m not entirely sure, spy. and before my time--rich SF ‘heads probably had a direct hook-up, like burma or bangkok--or nor.mex-- to SFO until Raygun took over (then cola instead of H...). Did Miss Sadat, like...ever..perish the thought

    JG had already developed a taste for that, what in late 60s, hadn’t he. KTEL Presents the Berube Mix: yr favorite narcotic-related soundtrack...

    Posted by Ezra Hound  on  04/26  at  07:26 PM
  14. Nope Ezra, JG had actually avoided his taste for the Persian and beyond prior to 1978 (he was deeply troubled, for a while, by the deaths of his peers from overdoses). 

    But following the wonderful Egypt trip it became apparent that he, and a great many others, had fallen deep into the belly of some dragon chasing (oh that Steely Dan soundtrack takes on a whole different meaning).  The large boxes were actually owned by a subsidiary of sorts and required band approval to get back home (the band being solely owned then by JG and PL).  The back story really does involve the flow of lysergic acid diethylamide to various eastern locations (eastern Europe, MidEast, Asia) with return materials from said locations.  Madame Sadat was a wonderful hostess and gracious interloper, attached with various officials with a variety of connections. 

    As captcha notes, it is always about the “doors” of perception.

    Posted by  on  04/27  at  02:58 AM
  15. I don’t want to waste Mr. Bérubé’s bandwidth on this, but if you are interested in more of the story, use my email and i will be happy to share.

    Posted by  on  04/27  at  03:03 AM
  16. that Steely Dan soundtrack takes on a whole different meaning

    break out the hardware, let’s do it… right. I’m cool on the dead manga, spy. The shall we say anthropological aspects of the GD, the connections, influences, drug culture etc. are somewhat interesting, tho’ to me the music--using, say Europe ‘72 as representative sample--sounds great only about 25% of the time...S-Dan on the other hand nearly 50%

    The early Dan’s muzak, say Bodhisattva at least up’ed the musical ante substantially--and the big Dan--steam-powered, lest we fergit-- tweaked the heartland [or maybe jacked it wit’ some china white] as much as the dead skulls did, tho’ eventually that became part of Rock, Inc as well--counterkultur, com-modified. The remaining old beatnik rockers now work for Apple, or is it google.

    Posted by Ezra Hound  on  04/27  at  11:11 AM
  17. An old joke --

    Q:
    What did the Deadhead say when the drugs wore off?

    A:
    (grimaces and covers ears) What’s that fucking noise?

    Update. A google search to try to pin down exactly how old this artifact might be reveals that the punch line has been softened over the years. The older version is funnier.

    Posted by  on  04/27  at  01:48 PM
  18. Well you could start with Fire in the Hole, move onto the Boston Rag, Charley Freak, and the harder stuff Dr Wu, Rose Garden, Kid Charlemagne, and then finally, nearly ten years later: Time Out of Mind. 

    Son you better be ready for love
    On this glory day
    This is your chance to believe
    What I’ve got to say

    Keep your eyes on the sky
    Put a dollar in the kitty
    Don’t the moon look pretty

    Tonight when I chase the dragon
    The water will change to cherry wine
    And the silver will turn to gold
    Time out of mind

    I am holding the mystical sphere
    It’s direct from Lhasa
    Where people are rolling in the snow
    Far from the world we know

    Children we have it right here
    It’s the light in my eyes
    It’s perfection and grace
    It’s the smile on my face

    Tonight when I chase the dragon
    The water will change to cherry wine
    And the silver will turn to gold
    Time out of mind

    Children we have it right here
    It’s the light in my eyes
    It’s perfection and grace
    It’s the smile on my face

    Tonight when I chase the dragon
    The water will change to cherry wine
    And the silver will turn to gold
    Time out of mind

    Posted by  on  04/28  at  12:18 AM
  19. Yeah, spydie, SD’s hits greatest CD we got.  Talented boys, or at least the kitties they hired were though with Aja and later they developed that professional session-with-boo-coo peruvian flake-and-cuervo sound, and in a sense sold their rocker souls (assuming they had any to begin wit’wink. Fagen’s lyrics--not bad..sort of brill building types but...chasin’ the dragon. They moved some product--(and lined the pockets of entertainment executives..)

    Posted by Ezra Hound  on  04/28  at  12:36 PM
  20. I saw Shannon dance once when the late, great Dance Umbrella was scheduling shows here in the Boston area.  Amazing stuff.  He does beautiful stuff and the way he uses his body makes you think about how you use yours.

    Saw Michael Moschen, the great juggler, a few months ago and noticed that he was limping as he performs his amazing feats.  He complained about the limitations he feels as he grows older.  There are some things which he can’t do any more but he still looks great to me.

    Truth is, we are all disabled from time to time and the longer we live the less our body’s tend to cooperate with us.  However, just today a friend sent me a book called _How to Dance Forever_ by Daniel Nagrin, a dancer who kept on dancing into his nineties.  Something to aspire to.

    Posted by gmoke  on  04/29  at  12:34 AM
  21. Nice videos. Your post reminded me my school years. I have not visited my school since graduation.

    Posted by MBA Lady  on  04/29  at  07:36 AM
  22. I hope you aren’t beaten savagely and thrown into a locker. Maybe that was just me.

    Posted by Compare it  on  05/05  at  01:51 AM
  23. I know nobody who doesn’t feel nostalgia thinking about his or her school! I think it’s the law of life: when we go there we hate this building and then we regret.

    Posted by resume writing services  on  06/30  at  02:16 PM
  24. yes, I also miss my school years, friends and all this stuff...where we all could be so carefree..

    Posted by CIMA student  on  01/20  at  07:36 AM

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