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Party time, part two

I was talking the other day with a friend and longtime blog-reader/ sometime commenter who was surprised to learn that I wasn’t on the Obama Train from the moment it left the station.  “What about the Obama/ Bérubé 2020 ticket?” she asked.  “Weren’t you planning to team up with him the moment he gave that speech in Boston back in 2004?” Well, no, actually I wasn’t.  I thought it was a remarkable speech, and I was thrilled that he was going to trounce poor befuddled Alan Keyes, and I did make up a few Obama/ Bérubé bumper stickers (and what, really, is more mellifluous than “Obama/ Bérubé”?  It’s just about the best sounding ticket ever).  But once he arrived in the Senate, he managed to cool my ardor pretty quickly.  He was on the wrong side of the Schiavo circus to begin with (though I’m glad to see that he’s apologized for that one); he made nice with his new mentor and Sith lord Joe Lieberman; and he didn’t say much about those Alito and Roberts fellows as they made their way onto the Supreme Court.  I didn’t expect him to stop the war single-handedly, and I knew that I couldn’t expect a freshman senator to step up and take a leadership position in the party, but hell, I thought, he’s a rising star, he’s been on magazine covers, he could establish himself pretty easily as a hot young prospect in the Feingold/ Dean wing of the party. And he didn’t.  So gradually, he dropped off my radar.

Now, anyone who’s been reading me for more than a week or so knows that I don’t do the purity thing.  Feingold himself voted to confirm John Ashcroft; the sainted Paul Wellstone voted for the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996.  There are people out there who will never forgive either vote, but I ain’t one of them.  Still, I saw no compelling reason to jump on the Obama bandwagon in 2007.  Late that year, Nick informed me enthusiastically that Obama was within striking distance in Iowa.  “Meh,” I replied.  “Meh?” he said, incredulously.  “Meh,” I repeated.  “So who are you thinking about instead?” he asked.  “I honestly don’t know,” I said.  “I like to think good things about Edwards, and I hope he stays in the race long enough to push the rest of them toward universal health care, but I’m not convinced that a guy who was one of the most conservative Democrats in the ‘04 race is really the successor to Eugene Debs, and of course we know his campaign has to go dark after March or something because he’ll be out of money.  And Dodd has really taken the lead on civil liberties, so if the primary were today I might even vote for him.  Because, you know, we really need more pasty guys with shiny white hair running things.  But I’m really and truly undecided.” And Nick was OK with that.

Then, of course, Obama did win Iowa, and Hillary won New Hampshire, and you’d think that I would have declared my allegiance by then.  Because what I dreaded above all was a center-right Democratic Party that runs a ten- or eleven-state national campaign, hoping yet again to scratch out a two-for-three in Florida, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.  Call it the FLOP approach.  I was a Dean guy in the ‘04 primaries, a paid-up member of the Dean-for-DNC-chair wing of the netroots, and a strong believer in the fifty-state strategy.  And I thought Obama would be a better fifty-state candidate, better able to take advantage of the demographic changes in the west/ southwest and better able to help downticket Democrats from Montana to New Mexico.  Clinton, for her part, was beginning the Long Slide, insinuating to voters in Iowa and New Hampshire that Obama couldn’t be trusted on reproductive rights.  Wolfson and Penn became more profoundly annoying with each passing day.  And gradually, gradually, I decided that Obama was my only . . . what is the word?  Oh yes, my only hope to see the leadership and the national electoral strategy of the Democratic Party wrested from the dead hand of Clintonism at last.  Because the ten- or eleven-state FLOP approach was Clintonism distilled: cede vast amounts of territory to Republicans, defend one tiny little corner of American political life, and be sure to throw your leftward friends under the bus at every opportunity.

And so I officially endorsed Obama in late January, thereby catapulting him to his astonishing sweep of eleventyteen thousand consecutive primary victories in February.

I got caught up in it all, no question.  A few of my posts at TPM Café made that clear, though they were more about Hillary’s increasingly execrable campaign than about Obama’s transcendent virtues.  Like this one and this one and this one and that one.  Dang, those were really hard to find!  Apparently the new TPM layout has managed to obliterate authors’ archives.  Besides, I liked it better when I was writin’ silly stuff over there, like this and this.  A lot of TPM readers didn’t go for it, but I confess I really enjoyed writing

Some observers, noting that the Republican field is divided among candidates who hate taxes, Muslims, atheists, Mexicans, gays and lesbians, evolutionary theorists, and versions of their earlier selves, have suggested that the solution lies not in a “Coordinate the Hate” campaign but in a more radical effort, known as the “Rudy Tancromnabee Project,” to combine the brains of three or four candidates using experimental technologies developed by mad scientists. “It sounds crazy, but it just might work,” said Dr. Grover Horowitz of the American Fusion Institute. “If we can come up with a composite ‘unity’ candidate who can hate big government, immigrants, homosexuals, scientists, atheists, and Islamofascists all at the same time and at the same level of intensity, we won’t even need to have a primary.”

Ah, those were good times.

And I started to check myself: were gender politics a factor for me?  Was I more comfortable with Obama because he was, you know, a guy?  Almost every woman I met back then was supporting Hillary, and their level of identification with her was intense. Back then, academe wasn’t wall-to-wall Obamaniacs; on every campus I visited, there were plenty of smart, accomplished professional women who had dealt with decades of sexist bullshit from their colleagues, and Hillary’s many trials and tribulations spoke to their lives (I did not inquire as to whether they had weaselly womanizing spouses as well).  But after checking myself thoroughly in the space-age Genderometer, I decided I was supporting Obama against Clinton not because of either candidate’s gender or race or drinking abilities or athletic skills, but simply because I wanted a new map, a new alignment, a new party.

Though I have to say that the sheer size and enthusiasm of Obama’s rallies did impress me in one respect: they finally gave conservative intellectuals a healthy appreciation of the dangers of fascism.  These people weren’t fazed by the theory of the unitary executive, or by Bush’s “signing statements,” or by the Cheney Archipelago of secret detention-and-torture sites.  They didn’t mind it much when Bush campaign rallies included chanted loyalty oaths.  They scoffed when schoolteachers were arrested for wearing “protect our civil liberties” T-shirts at Bush campaign events.  But they were finally alerted—by Obama’s crowds, by his oratory, by his campaign’s sense of graphic design—to the dangers of charismatic leadership and totalitarian rule.  And that’s a good thing, I guess.  Late to the party, but still.

One last note.  Just before I officially endorsed Obama for President, I visited Duquesne University.  I talked about this stuff from my forthcoming book.  At lunch the next day, a couple of graduate students asked me whether I thought there might be a sudden groundswell of support for Obama, sweeping the nation and changing the dynamics of the race.  Wouldn’t that make Democratic politics popular, in a cultural-studies kinda sense?  Sure, I said.  It would be really interesting.  But I just don’t think it’s gonna happen.  Super Duper Tuesday is just two weeks off, Hillary leads Obama by double digits in state after state, and I just don’t see how Obama’s going to make up that kind of ground.  He’s gonna get crushed in California and New York, and after that, I think it’s just a game of attrition.  Deep, heavy sigh.

I mention this just to admit that when it comes to politics, my prognosticatin’ skills are sometimes no better than Mark Penn’s.  I’m pleased and relieved to say that I was right about Obama’s potential to run a truly national campaign instead of a FLOP sweat, and the downticket races look pretty good.  But when it comes to predicting things other than Super Bowls, I am not so good.  So don’t be asking me about next Tuesday.

Tomorrow, I promise, will be exceptionally Arbitrary.

Posted by on 10/30 at 09:03 AM
  1. Late to the party, but still.

    It was nice to see how the Republican establishment went back and repealed or denounced all of their unitary-executive, rule-by-Anointed-Good-Men, replace-policy-with-campaigning, replace-civil-servants-with-loyalists practices after they had that epiphany. Just think what problems we might have in the next president’s term if they had left all of those corrupt Republican loyalists in place throughout the executive and judicial branches. Like the good, character-ful Christians they are, however, once they found themselves convicted of a wrong they repented and changed their ways.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  10:58 AM
  2. I’m still waiting for somebody to explain to me how yelling “woo!” at a pep-rally disqualifies one for the presnitcy.

    I’ve been an admirer of Hillary since 1992.  She’s smart; she’s a rational personality type in a way that’s off-putting to a lot of people, but I identify with it; and I like it that she doesn’t play gender games, doesn’t try to use a flirtatious manner to pave her way into communicating better.  She’s not a gosh darned winker, donchaknow, you betcha!  I want to see more women on the national political stage, but I’d like it if that stage didn’t become eerily reminiscent of an episode of Elimidate in the process.

    But between her and Obama on policy, I couldn’t see enough daylight to care much one way or the other which of them made it to the convention.  Edwards had the health care issue wrapped up in red ribbons, and when he was out of the primaries, so was I.  I actually went to the Virginia primaries and pulled the lever for Huckabee.  Not because I particularly like Huckabee, understand.  I just couldn’t pass up the opportunity to fuck with Republicans.

    I’m glad though now that Obama won the primaries.  Because, no, he’s not the most liberalist liberal ever to liberal a liberal in the liberal Senate, but he’s a step in the right direction, and the way he’s running his campaign, he’s paving the way for others to come after him and keep stepping in that direction.  And that’s something that I don’t believe Hillary could ever have done.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  11:09 AM
  3. I do admire Obama’s campaigning paradigm shift, of not ceding “red states” to the GOP without a fight. Conventional wisdom shoots itself in the foot sometimes.

    I’m honestly surprised that Obama has been able to maintain the mindset he introduced in his 2004 DNC speech. It seemed frightfully pollyannaish, and after Kerry and Gore’s losses seemed partly due to not fighting low blows with more low blows, I figured Obama was sure to come out swinging at some point. But nope. He’s remained Calm, Cool, and Collected (sing to the tune of “Signed, Sealed, Delivered"). And what do you know? It resonates. People are drawn to the positivity, the disavowal of hate and bad manners.

    My captcha is missing its punctuation: hes

    Posted by Orange  on  10/30  at  12:29 PM
  4. 1.  “Obama/ Bérubé”—isn’t that the beginning of the chorus of “Kokomo”?  The Beach Boys understood the mellifluous quality of the combination long ago.

    2.  I hope the Republicans give Dr. Grover Horowitz a big bonus for all his work:

    “If we can come up with a composite ‘unity’ candidate who can hate big government, immigrants, homosexuals, scientists, atheists, and Islamofascists all at the same time and at the same level of intensity, we won’t even need to have a primary.”

    Sarah Palin, the new “unity” candidate, will be running in 2012.  Hurray! No primary needed!  Great work, Dr. Horowitz.  Additional points for her mad skillz with guns.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  12:39 PM
  5. 1.  “Obama/ Bérubé”—isn’t that the beginning of the chorus of “Kokomo”?  The Beach Boys understood the mellifluous quality of the combination long ago.

    I always thought Bérubé was what the rest of the Stones chanted behind Mick on “Shattered.” Shows what I know.

    Anyway, it’s amazing to me how much this post tracks my own experience with assessing Obama.  I saw him speak in 2006 and thought “OK, this guy is really a good speaker but really, he’s too young and besides, Hillary is going to wrap it up.” And as much as I admired lots of things about Hillary, the idea of 8 years of VP Bush followed by 4 years of President Bush followed by 8 years of President Clinton followed by 8 years of President Bush followed by 8 more years of President Clinton was just too banana-republicky for me to swallow.  So hey, it came to be February and Obama was OK and looky here, he’s getting farther ahead and now it’s just great.  Or could be!

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  12:53 PM
  6. "So don’t be asking me about next Tuesday.”
    [scuffing feet humbly] point taken—no more over/under Vegas prognosticator jokes.

    captcha: “week,” as in less than a.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  12:56 PM
  7. Yes, I followed the same path in my thinking. It took me a long time to warm up to Obama.

    Posted by Hattie  on  10/30  at  01:05 PM
  8. ...and what, really, is more mellifluous than “Obama/Bérubé”?

    Bérubé/Obama fits the “Kokomo” vibe just a bit better. But why quibble?

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  01:23 PM
  9. Kucinich was my first choice. Edwards was my second choice. Both had dropped out by the time the CA primary took place, so I was angstily undecided when primary day rolled around.

    After much scrounging around online, I determined that Mike Gravel was the next-best policy fit for me. Quoth my partner: “California has a chance to determine who gets the nomination this year, and you’re going to vote for Gravel? I really think you’re going to regret this.”

    We had a split household: I eventually voted for Clinton, because I believe that universal health care can’t really be universal if it’s also optional. My partner voted for Obama, because he felt it was likely that Obama could be talked into a better health care plan, and he worried that the “anybody but Clinton” vote would keep the Dems out of the White House.

    But I knew even as I left the voting booth that I could happily vote for either of them in the General Election. That doesn’t mean I’m not grouchy about FISA; nor does it mean that I think Obama has said enough about the dangers of the HHS Secretary’s “conscience clause” for physicians, something that Clinton has addressed at length. But I will cheerfully vote in a general elections for the viable candidate whose positions are closer to my own.

    BTW, today’s San Jose Mercury News cites Field Poll taken this week that shows a 22% lead for Obama in California. That’s the biggest lead a Dem has had in this blue state since FDR.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  01:33 PM
  10. I felt kinda the same way you did way back when.

    (Long time reader, first time poster ... glad you’re back blogging, Mr. Berube!)

    Posted by matthew_frederick  on  10/30  at  01:42 PM
  11. My prognosticating skills are famously infallible, but I’ll happily confess I became an Obamamaniac early on, and for slightly less instrumental reasons.  Namely:  he’s a college professor.  He has an academic cast of mind, in the best sense of the word.  I got to chat with him for a few short minutes back in 2004, and his quickness and intellectual curiosity are astonishing—he wanted to know all about physics, and this “blogging” phenomenon, and seemed much more interested in listening than in talking.

    I want someone like that in the White House.  Very much.  I will undoubtedly disagree with him on policy from time to time—that’s basically inevitable with someone who can actually get elected to office, and Obama is definitely that.  But it’s okay.  I won’t refrain from criticizing him on individual actions, but as far as basically being beholden to his awesomeness, I’m in the tank.

    Posted by Sean Carroll  on  10/30  at  01:43 PM
  12. All right, enough with the “Kokomo” shit already.  Not only is it harshing my internal mental soundtrack, which right now is playing Teh Best Song of the Twenty-First Century over and over (that’s tomorrow’s post, folks!), but it bears no relation to how my unpronounceable name is actually pronounced.  It’s more like BEHruhbay, just for the record.

    OK, back to Hillary.  The Bush-Clinton-Bush-Clinton thing didn’t bug me too much, and there were two things that made me sympathetic to Hillary before her campaign went downhill.  One was the bullshit over her verklempt moment in NH (and Edwards was a heel for piling on in that one).  The second was the Whole Clinton Dynamic.  She put up with a good bit of abuse from Bill, getting out there and defending him against the VRWC while he diddled with cigars and interns.  This, on top of the already toxic levels of abuse she’d gotten from the VRWC itself.  Of course, this is implicitly what Hillary meant by citing her decades of “experience”—it wasn’t about crawling into Bosnia under sniper fire, it was about dealing with years of spittle-flecked wingnut hate as well as the weaselly womanizing shtick at home.  And it’s not hard to admire someone who’s remained human and sane in the face of all that.

    Posted by Michael  on  10/30  at  01:56 PM
  13. It’s more like BEHruhbay, just for the record.

    So kind of like on Shattered, then.

    (That thumping sound you hear is just the equine carcass, so pay it no mind.)

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  02:00 PM
  14. Oh, and Sean: on the cultural-elite front, yes, props to Obama’s general intellectual awesomeness.  He asked you about physics and blogging?  Goddamn.  I bet he spells Ed Witten’s name right, too.

    But aren’t you afraid of provoking another Obama-and-controversial-professor scandal by admitting that you met him and spoke with him?  I can just hear Palin’s stump speech tomorrow:  Barack Obama is not like you and me.  His friends are terrorists and Palestinians and physicist-bloggers who believe the universe is “preposterous.” Do we want a person in the White House who doesn’t believe in God? Crowd:  noooooooo! upon which someone yells put him in a black hole!

    Posted by Michael  on  10/30  at  02:02 PM
  15. So kind of like on Shattered, then.

    No no no no no no no!  No!  Strong stress on first syllable, and the u is like an uh rather than an oo, and . . . .

    Oh never mind.

    Posted by Michael  on  10/30  at  02:04 PM
  16. My brain’s been battered, splattered all over Manhattan.

    smile

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  02:09 PM
  17. You wrote “afraid of” when I think you meant “obviously angling for.”

    Captcha:  “possible.”

    Posted by Sean Carroll  on  10/30  at  02:16 PM
  18. I remember Obama’s 2004 speech not just for that but also being right around the time I got off the Daily Kos bandwagon--it wasn’t just that Gilliard and Billmon were replaced with Armando etc, I just got tired of the wide-eyed messianism over there, and never went back.  Anyway, for awhile, I decided that people were too willing to cut the guy slack as the next great hope even though he was kind of a milquetoast . . . accomodator, or something.  I was skeptical.  But then I happened to be in Kansas City one weekend in October 2006, and drove past a rally he was having, and was just blown away by the energy and enthusiasm.  I stayed on the sidelines early on, and kinda thought I would vote for Edwards or Dodd, but the day Edwards dropped out was almost a relief--I gave $200 to Obama the same morning and here I am…

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  03:07 PM
  19. "and after Kerry and Gore’s losses seemed partly due to not fighting low blows with more low blows, I figured Obama was sure to come out swinging at some point. But nope.”

    Oh no, Orange in comment #3.  I hate to see this narrative re-forming.  When Obama finally came out swinging was when his campaign started to turn around.  He was losing, remember?  Right around then was when he started to respond to McCain’s Ayers ad with the ad that said “Barack was eight at the time.  Why is McCain so interested in talking about the 60s?” Which would have given establishment Democrats of any other cycle the vapors.

    No one wants, or ever did want, a candidate who curses like a blogger.  But let’s not preemptively whitewash the campaign in one big happy glow of “Obama made me feel good about politics again.”

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  03:13 PM
  20. they finally gave conservative intellectuals a healthy appreciation of the dangers of fascism

    That’s a vicious misrepresentation of the illiberal viewpoint, sir. Fouad “Terrorist in Name Only” Ajami sets the record straight:

    There is something odd—and dare I say novel—in American politics about the crowds that have been greeting Barack Obama on his campaign trail. Hitherto, crowds have not been a prominent feature of American politics. We associate them with the temper of Third World societies.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  03:14 PM
  21. Sean are you on Obama’s short list for DOE secretary yet? If not let’s get that bandwagon started right here, right now.

    e.

    (oops captcha word “filled” it might already be too late)

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  03:17 PM
  22. My initial support for Elliot Spitzer didn’t work out the way I’d hoped, and so I gravitated toward Kucinich and then Obama because of their opposition to the war in Iraq. I remained an Obama supporter even as his position on the pull out modified and became more “responsibile.” After Tuesday, should he win (and I sure hope he does), progressives will need to maintain pressure on this new administration to withdraw troops as quickly as possible, and blunt the bellicose tone toward Pakistan. There’s no time for a honeymoon, and the war ought not take a backseat to economic issues. In short, I’m voting for Obama not out of agreement with his policies, but because he seems reasonable enough to hear out opinions from the critical left. I don’t see any point in pretending Obama is on the left (except in relation to the right of Bush/McCain).

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  03:24 PM
  23. So, vowels and stress as in, say, “getaway” then? No puns intended (or so I think).

    ^_^J.

    Posted by gyokusai  on  10/30  at  03:29 PM
  24. My theory about primaries is that I want to vote for the candidate with the views that are closest to my own, so that I can pull the party leftward by demonstrating that there is support for stuff like single-payer.  Unfortunately Mike Gravel wasn’t on the New York ballot, and although we voted early enough to have made a difference this time, there was never any real doubt that HRC was going to win here, even if she had to do it without me.  She voted to give Bush the war he wanted, and that was either too calculating or too naive for me to countenance. Obama was committed to running a more or less 50 state campaign, and that looked more like the Democratic Party, and the America, that I wanted to see.  Capcha: “are”, as in, “are you surprised it worked out this way?” Yes, pleasantly so.

    Posted by Bill Altreuter  on  10/30  at  03:51 PM
  25. My initial support for Elliot Spitzer didn’t work out the way I’d hoped

    Yeah, you should have stepped up and supported Edwards instead, Chris.  There’s a squeaky-clean guy for you.

    Sean are you on Obama’s short list for DOE secretary yet? If not let’s get that bandwagon started right here, right now.

    That would be the Department of Dark Energy, Elliot.  Let the bandwagon roll!

    Posted by Michael  on  10/30  at  04:02 PM
  26. yeah he could be the DODE DUDE....

    e.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  04:09 PM
  27. What a fun day to check back in with all things Bérubé and thanks be that Michael’s back on the air!

    Down here in NC, we’re real friendly to converts. (I’m beginning to believe we have enough in the state to make Tuesday a Good Day.) And Michael, even if you don’t think Obama will bring everybody a pony, well, heck, not to worry--I’m saving you some of the leftover lumber I had after building a stall and corral in my backyard last weekend.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  04:44 PM
  28. what, really, is more mellifluous than “Obama/ Bérubé”?  It’s just about the best sounding ticket ever

    Plus, you could sing “Roar, Lion, Roar” in two-part harmony.  I’d like to hear you both sing “While the sons of Knickerbocker rally ‘round!” just to get in one more funny-sounding name.

    Say, weren’t you guys either the same class or a year apart? Hmmm...I’m surprised McPalin has jumped on you as one of Obama’s most dangerous professor friends.

    Posted by Dr. Virago  on  10/30  at  04:46 PM
  29. Let us all hope that the next President chooses his Dark-Energy Czar very, very carefully.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  05:09 PM
  30. 28: I’m surprised McPalin has jumped on you as one of Obama’s most dangerous professor friends.

    “Our opponent is someone who sees America as imperfect enough to pal around with nihilists who targeted their own world.”

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  06:09 PM
  31. Speaking of nihilists, JP. . . .

    Posted by Michael  on  10/30  at  06:18 PM
  32. At the risk being pilloried for injecting a note of seriousness in an otherwise quite entertaining thread, I have had low expectations of Obama since the FISA capitulation, if not before. I won’t be too surprised when he sends us down the river (again). What might have more of a potential to disappoint or delight is the grassroots aspect of Obama’s campaign. If enough current organizers’ energies aren’t slaked by “just” electing a President who can speak (let alone think), Obama’s organization could turn into a populist force that might, on occasion, even oppose its creator.

    I guess that makes me an inveterate optimist.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  06:36 PM
  33. "Obama’s organization could turn into a populist force that might, on occasion, even oppose its creator.”

    i think that may in fact be the plan.

    (captcha “sent” as in: President Obama, if elected, had better plan to dance with the ones what sent him to the Inaugural Ball--me, and all yinz millions of other $5, $15 & $50 “me’s”.)

    Librarian (and Mr. M. BEHruhbay, it is so nice to have you back where you belong!)

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  06:56 PM
  34. Your powers of prognostication are impressive even if you don’t see them that way. You wrote:

    After months of flirting with Chris Dodd and then hoping that John Edwards sticks around in the Democratic primaries, talkin’ health care and generally makin’ trouble, I have finally decided to endorse Obama for President.

    Apparently, you were channelin’ Sarah Palin way back when, you betcha!

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  07:43 PM
  35. Huh> I always thought it was Be-RUBE- ay, with the emphasiss on the “rube”

    Posted by KMTBERRY  on  10/30  at  07:50 PM
  36. 31: Speaking of nihilists

    That proves nothing, Michael. Absolutely nothing!

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  09:08 PM
  37. Clearly, he’s got nothing to prove.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  09:24 PM
  38. Nihil’s just another word for nothin’ left to prove.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  09:59 PM
  39. Well, Stormcrow, I don’t care.

    Posted by Hattie  on  10/30  at  09:59 PM
  40. But don’t you see? I don’t either!! I don’t care, I don’t care, I don’t care. I really, really, really, *really* just DO NOT CARE!

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  10:06 PM
  41. This thread is going nowhere.

    Posted by  on  10/30  at  11:50 PM
  42. WHAT DO YOU GET IF YOU MULTIPLY SIX BY NINE?

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  12:20 AM
  43. I always pronounced it more Gallically, with the emphasis on the final syllable.  But I’ve heard Nussbaum say it right, so it won’t be too hard to change.

    But Damn, “Grover Horowitz”?  You can just rock me to sleep tonight, Michael!

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  12:47 AM
  44. So, who will win the super bowl?

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  02:48 AM
  45. Man I am steamed… STEAMED!

    I still have a freaking box of Obama/Bérubé bumper stickers that I preordered from the Sticker Shack.... at fifty cents a pop!

    Recently, I got the scissors out and started rearranging them a little.

    Does anybody want a sticker that says, “a beau BOmber?” How about “amOeba Be rub?  “Babe urea mOb?”

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  03:02 AM
  46. Ooops sorry.  That vomit splattered thought attempt began when i read that Obama-wan-konobi was interested in hiring Raul Emanuel as his Chief of Staff.  Raul is so, so very, far to our collective right, it is downwrong disgusting to consider he could be the string puller of the White House.  Yuck.

    Over the Summer of 2007, during a panel discussion on surviving the remainder of the Bush administration’s reign of terror on the planet, the candidacy of Barack was examined.  The only truly positive construct, that garnered sufficient support, was the semioticity of President Obama as something the rest of the world would recognize and acknowledge as a substantively changed United States.

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  03:25 AM
  47. Stormcrow: you don’t care too much.

    Posted by Hattie  on  10/31  at  03:59 AM
  48. [Quick O/T]
    I’d love to read what you think about this, if you have time after the election.
    [/O/T]

    Posted by Helen  on  10/31  at  06:32 AM
  49. (and what, really, is more mellifluous than “Obama/ Bérubé”?  It’s just about the best sounding ticket ever)

    I was really really fond of “Obama/<a href = “http://markstrama.com">Strama</a>".

    Of course, there’s something to be said too for “Barack Obama/<a href = “http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/council/wynn.htm">Will Wynn</a>.”

    Posted by Strama Supporter  on  10/31  at  10:05 AM
  50. Reading those TPM posts, I’d say your prognosticating looks pretty good overall, Michael. The one about the Rudy Tancromnabee Project, for instance, neatly foreshadowed McCain’s entire campaign. And you got the part about the wingnuts using Obama’s middle name a lot exactly right, though in fairness, that probably didn’t require much in the way of prognosticating skills.

    (My own trajectory of Obama support exactly mirrors yours, but I am useless at prognosticating, so I will avoid it in order not to doom Tuesday’s results.)

    I’m surprised that so many people didn’t know how to pronounce Berube, btw. How else would you pronounce it? (Granted, I first heard his name in the early ‘80s when I was at Barnard, so I guess I’m just used to it.

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  12:10 PM
  51. Thy rod and thy calf, they comfort me, sings Sweet Sarah to her flock of little Palin’s

    http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/2008/10/wheres_charlton_heston_when_yo.php

    Posted by  on  10/31  at  08:16 PM
  52. That vomit splattered thought attempt began when i read that Obama-wan-konobi was interested in hiring Raul Emanuel as his Chief of Staff.  Raul is so, so very, far to our collective right, it is downwrong disgusting to consider he could be the string puller of the White House.

    Thanks for the delightful metaphorical turn spyder, and try to look on the bright side.  First,
    <pedant>
    it’s “Rahm.”

    Second, (and no, I’m not going to close the pedant tag yet; what would be the point?) at least this would get Rahm out of Congress and away from the DCCC, where his proclivities much more directly hamper a progressive agenda.  So, say he becomes Evil Henchman of the West Wing.  I’m not sure this signals the policy direction of a strong-willed President.  Yes, it would be a case of “falling up” for the man who brought us Tim Mahoney as the replacement for Mark Foley, but that’s been how the capital works for a looong time.

    It’s more like BEHruhbay, just for the record.

    The accent marks mean something?  Who knew?

    </pedant>

    Posted by  on  11/02  at  11:57 PM
  53. Politics has never been my thing, but I know a good person when I see one. Although its hard to distinguish who is who in politics, still it would be easy for us to choose who is rightful to a particular position. But then again, we all have our own perspectives.

    Posted by Surf Clothing  on  06/18  at  10:21 AM
  54. Interesting discussion. Politics is really a messed up world.

    Posted by Online Certificate Programs  on  06/30  at  12:17 PM
  55. You certainly had a great experience, Not all of the people get the chance to be in that event.

    Posted by Sydney CBD  on  09/02  at  10:53 AM
  56. Thanks for sharing your experience to your readers. That really is a good one.

    Posted by Scellier Bouvard  on  09/03  at  02:14 PM
  57. Obama has still a lot to prove to the people. I hasn’t really seen the changes that he promised.

    Posted by Expatriate community portal  on  09/07  at  05:51 PM
  58. Meeting the president would really be a great experience.

    Posted by Plumbing Raleigh NC  on  09/10  at  03:58 PM
  59. It would definitely be an honor to meet the president. But of course, not everyone can have that opportunity. I would love to meet the president and have a chitchat with him.

    Posted by Domestic Violence Attorney  on  09/15  at  04:33 PM
  60. Make me think, what would I actually say if I had a chance to meet the president. What would be most important for me to say?

    Posted by Attorneys in Augusta  on  10/04  at  07:13 PM
  61. Well, for me, I think the honor of meeting a president will depend on what kind of president is in front of me.

    Posted by Taxis Maidenhead  on  10/26  at  10:02 AM
  62. You have a point, but not just the honor but also the one of a kind experience would also be awesome.

    Posted by Handyman London  on  03/14  at  07:31 PM
  63. I think you made sure nice points in features also. Thanks!

    Posted by Mathan Hanry  on  03/20  at  04:45 AM
  64. I always had a feeling that Obama was going to win the Presidency.  I jumped on the Obama train right after I found out he was running.  I’m glad I did, because I really think he’s doing a decent job, even though we have a lot of problems to address.

    Posted by Charles  on  03/29  at  06:30 AM
  65. The only truly positive construct, that garnered sufficient support, was the semioticity of President Obama as something the rest of the world would recognize and acknowledge as a substantively changed United States.

    Posted by Roof Cleaning Tampa  on  05/05  at  01:12 PM
  66. I would like to meet with him here in Tampa Florida.

    Posted by Pressure Washing Tampa Florida  on  05/09  at  10:41 AM
  67. Well if you want to see him,maybe you can set your time and location for meet up.You can also ask some guides in FL.

    Posted by Jefflee  on  09/26  at  05:21 AM
  68. Obama could have done more.

    Posted by Andrew  on  10/19  at  04:58 AM
  69. The one about the Rudy Tancromnabee Project, for instance, neatly foreshadowed McCain’s entire campaign. And you got the part about the wingnuts using Obama’s middle name a lot exactly right, though in fairness, that probably didn’t require much in the way of prognosticating skills.

    Posted by Limo Hire Perth  on  01/08  at  12:47 PM
  70. I don’t think Obama will get reelected.

    Posted by Shine  on  01/18  at  12:13 PM
  71. The only truly positive construct, that garnered sufficient support, was the semioticians of President Obama as something the rest of the world would recognize and acknowledge as a substantively changed United States.

    Posted by donkey trekking  on  02/15  at  06:09 PM
  72. I won’t refrain from criticizing him on individual actions, but as far as basically being beholden to his awesomeness, I’m in the tank.

    Posted by Impermeabilizzazione balconi  on  02/21  at  03:42 PM
  73. He’s gonna get crushed in California and New York, and after that, I think it’s just a game of attrition.  Deep, heavy sigh.

    Posted by HVAC Equipment Sizing  on  03/07  at  07:12 PM
  74. And you got the part about the wingnuts using Obama’s middle name a lot exactly right, though in fairness, that probably didn’t require much in the way of prognosticating skills.

    Posted by pub lottery  on  03/20  at  02:45 PM
  75. Stella Design an award winning graphic design, web design and web development agency Sydney. Our services include branding, graphic design and web design.

    Posted by Graphic Design Sydney  on  04/04  at  03:51 AM
  76. So, say he becomes Evil Henchman of the West Wing.  I’m not sure this signals the policy direction of a strong-willed President.

    Posted by Ulpan  on  04/16  at  08:55 PM
  77. Savoy Engineering Group only offers Room X Room acca manual j load calculation, Manual S HVAC Equipment Selections & Manual D Duct Designs. We are experts at IECC, ASHRAE & ACCA most recent Manual J8 standards impacting the load analysis results.

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  78. Agreed

    Posted by Windsor taxis  on  07/07  at  08:11 AM
  79. What does this mean for us.

    Posted by Maidenhead cabs  on  07/07  at  08:13 AM
  80. How comes this is so?

    Posted by Maidenhead taxi to heathrow  on  07/07  at  08:14 AM
  81. When is this going to happen

    Posted by Maidenhead taxi to Gatwick  on  07/07  at  08:15 AM
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  83. Very interesting video called “Obama Deception:
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  85. Go to management or HR. This option has some limitations, especially if the co-worker has the support of the boss. But don’t discount the possibility

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